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Citing Creative Commons Content Just Got Much Easier

Most people who blog very often know that at some point they are going to need to use a picture or other item which they find on the internet. Through sites such as flickr.com or using Google’s advanced image search, it is possible to find non-copyrighted pictures. These are generally licensed under Creative Commons and are free to be used (usually non-commercially) as long as you give credit to the original creator. Finding the information to cite images however can be time consuming and sometimes quite frustrating. Too often, a blogger may just forego altogether even attempting to give credit to their source. This of course is just plain wrong.

Recently at a meeting of technical minds in Barcelona, Spain during the “Learning, Freedom and the Web” Festival, a new add on was created to address this problem. It is called Open Attribute and works in both FireFox and Google Chrome browser.

watch out for falling dogs / Thom Watson / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
So, let’s say you want to do a post about humorous signs about dogs. You go to flickr.com and do an advanced search for dogs and signs that are licensed under creative commons. This picture to the right is one possibility that you find. However, one of the requirements of it’s CC (Creative Commons) license is that you give credit to the person who took and posted the photo.

After having installed the Open Attribute app, you will see a C with a circle around it in your address bar anytime you are on a site where information about CC is available. Just click on it to obtain the needed information to create the attribution. You can then choose to either copy it in plain text or html.

The plain text version looks like this:
watch out for falling dogs (http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomwatson/192312517/#/) / Thom Watson (http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomwatson/) / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/)

The HTML version looks like this:
watch out for falling dogs / Thom Watson / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

You can then choose which option you would prefer to use. This way you protect yourself from infringing on the rights of another person, and you show the respect you expect others to give you for what you put out on the internet.

Tags: Tips